Warren Chan named Canada Research Chair in Nanobioengineering

Professor Warren Chan

Professor Warren Chan has been named a Tier I Canada Research Chair in Nanobioengineering. (Photo: Neil Ta).

May 3, 2018

Professor Warren Chan (IBBME) has been named a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Nanobioengineering. He is currently the U of T Distinguished Professor of Nanobioengineering.

Professor Chan develops nanotechnology for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. He has published more than 90 peer-reviewed research articles, seven book chapters and a book. He has been cited over 39,000 times, given more than 150 invited presentations, and holds 15 patents/provisional patents.

Professor Chan is also the director of the U of T Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) and a principal investigator in the Donnelly Centre.

The Canada Research Chairs program enables U of T to attract and retain the best and most promising researchers from around the world. In addition to conducting research that improves our depth of knowledge and quality of life, the university’s allocation of 275 Canada Research Chairs significantly enhances its capacity to train the next generation of leaders in their fields through student supervision and teaching.

Professor Chan is one of two U of T Engineering researchers to be awarded new Canada Research Chairs, and an additional four faculty members to be advanced or renewed. Tier I chairs are awarded to outstanding researchers acknowledged by their peers as world leaders in their fields.

“I want to congratulate all of the new and renewed Canada Research Chairs at the University of Toronto and thank the government for supporting their important work,” says Vivek Goel, U of T’s vice-president of research and innovation.

“We are grateful to the Government of Canada for its ongoing investments in the Canada Research Chairs program and for the additional funding for this program announced in Budget 2018. Such investments not only yield new knowledge, but set the stage for important innovations ranging from new cancer therapies to sustainable transportation technologies that will improve lives in Canada and around the world.”

With files from Chris Sorensen and Engineering Strategic Communications